Planet Hollywood

Planet Hollywood has been operating in central London for 20 years and has played recorded music throughout the business since it opened. The famous restaurant is film-themed, displaying movie memorabilia and showing famous clips on screen.

Music is vital to the ambience created for customers dining in the restaurant. A video DJ plays a range of contemporary pop and classics, ensuring a mixture of current and older music that appeals to all the wide-range of customers who visit.

Setting a mood through playing music is important for Planet Hollywood – while music was not an essential part of the experience when the restaurant first opened, it is now fundamental and would greatly affect the atmosphere if it was not playing.

Tony Lincoln, European Sales and Marketing Director at Planet Hollywood, says: "Music is incredibly valuable to our business. It keeps our team motivated at the same time as keeping our customers happy.  Music is a vital part of the ambience we create for the guests dining with us, and what we play is carefully selected to ensure it appeals to all.  We believe the PPL licence is good value for money because it allows us to play the most up-to-date music.”

Latest Music Works research findings

  • 96%

    of current and ex gym members who do not attend exercise classes prefer listening to music by original artists5

  • 87%

    of current and ex gym members who attend exercise classes prefer listening to music by original artists5

  • 88%

    of staff who work in stores with music would prefer to listen to music by recognisable performers rather than sound-alikes 3

  • 99%

    of staff who work in stores without music think that retail stores that play music tend to be more modern and appealing places to shop 3

  • 46%

    of managers/business owners agreed that playing music for customers/clients says something about their brand and ‘who they are’ as a business 4

  • 1/4

    (25%) of retail businesses agree that they would lose business if they turned the music off 1

  • 1/3

    (31%) of hospitality businesses agreed they would rather lose a day’s trade than have to permanently stop playing music for customers or staff 1

1 Research was conducted by VisionCritical in April 2012 among 1,000 UK businesses and Entertainment Media Research in 2009 among 2,000 UK consumers. EMR also conducted the research in 2010 among 400 small retailers, hairdressers, offices and factories.

2 Research was conducted by RED in May 2013 with 676 customers of a UK travel company (x331 interviewed at stores that play music, x306 interviewed at stores that do not play music.)

3 Research was conducted by RED in May 2013 with 1397 staff of of a UK travel company (x1042 surveys completed by staff at stores that play music, x337 surveys completed by staff at stores that do not play music.)

4 Research was conducted by DJS Research in June 2013 among 600 businesses in the West Midlands

5 Source: YouGov Plc. online survey, April 2014. Total sample size: 7492 GB adults aged 18+. Figures have been weighted and are representative of all GB adults.

6 Research was conducted by Mindlab International in September 2014. (The research tested 26 participants carrying out office-based tasks while listening to four genres of music, and no music).

Additional information